The five most expensive public transportation projects for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics require some 22.6bn reais (US$6.89bn) in investment.

1. METRO LINE 4

Taking the gold medal is the city's 10bn-real metro line No. 4, which involves building and maintaining a 16km subway line between the neighborhoods of Gavea and Barra da Tijuca.

The six-station line is being built by the Rio-Barra consortium which is made up of local engineering companies Queiroz Galvão, Odebrecht Infraestrutura, Carioca Engenharia, Cowan and Servix. Nearly all of the investment is being financed through national development bank BNDES.

 

The Rio metro line No. 4's trajectory (CREDIT: Rio-Barra).

 

2. PORTO MARAVILHA

Updating Rio's port area, known as the Porto Maravilha project, wins silver with an 8.2bn-real investment. It involved building 70km of roads and 4km of tunnels. The main contractor is Brazil's largest engineering group Odebrecht.

Funding for the project was backed by the sale of Cepacs certificates, an instrument used to fund public construction projects in Brazil.

3. TRANSOLIMPICA BRT

Taking the bronze at 2.2bn reais is an initiative involving the Via Rio tollroads and the Transolímpica bus rapid transit (BRT) system which connects southwest Rio to the Deodoro Olympic park in the north.

The concession holder is the Rio Olímpico consortium comprising Odebrecht subsidiary Odebrecht TransPort (OTP), and transport infrastructure companies CCR and Invepar. BNDES is the main financer.

4. AIRPORT-DOWNTOWN LRT

Through a public-private partnership with the state government, the OTP-CCR-Invepar consortium is responsible for building and maintaining a 1.2bn-real light rail transit (LRT) system spanning 26km from Santos Dumont airport (near Porto Maravilha) to the downtown area. Half of the project is funded by the federal government and the other have by the concessionaire.

5. TRANSOESTE BRT

Finally, 1bn reais has being spent on the Transoeste BRT to extend it some 59km westward from Barra da Tijuca. Concession rights are also held by the OTP-CCR-Invepar consortium. Funding is coming from BNDES and the state.

 

Source: BNamericas

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